Home / Panelists


PANEL 1: Responding to New Foreign Policy and National Security Threats

Moderator:

Dr. Robin Dorff, General Douglas MacArthur Chair of Research and Professor of National Security Affairs, U.S. Army War College

BIO

Robin Dorff joined the Strategic Studies Institute in June 2007 as Research Professor of National Security Affairs. He previously served on the USAWC faculty as a Visiting Professor (1994-96) and as Professor of National Security Policy and Strategy in the Department of National Security and Strategy (1997-2004), where he also held the General Maxwell D. Taylor Chair (1999-2002) and served as Department Chairman (2001-2004). Dr. Dorff has been a Senior Advisor with Creative Associates International, Inc., in Washington, DC, and served as Executive Director of the Institute of Political Leadership in Raleigh, NC (2004-2006). Dr. Dorff remains extensively involved in strategic leadership development, focusing on national security strategy and policy, and strategy formulation. His research interests include these topics as well as failing and fragile states, interagency processes and policy formulation, stabilization and reconstruction operations, and US grand strategy. He lectures frequently on these topics and has spoken all over the U.S. and in Canada, Europe, Africa, and Asia, and at institutions such as the Africa Center for Strategic Studies, the Near East-South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, the George C. Marshall Center, the Marine Corps University, the Joint Special Operations School, the National Defense University of Taiwan, and the Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies in Singapore. He is the author or co-author of three books and numerous journal articles. Dr. Dorff is the recipient of the U.S. Army Superior Civilian Service Award and the U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal, and seven US Army War College Faculty Published Writing Awards (1996-2001, 2004). Professor Dorff holds a B.A. in Political Science from Colorado College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Panelists:


PANEL 2: Whole-of-Government Prospects and Challenges

Moderator:

Dr. Jack Moran, Associate Professor of Political Science, Kennesaw State University

BIO

Panelists:

PANEL 3: Whole-of-Government Lessons from Iraq and Afghanistan

Moderator:

Dr. Richard Vengroff, Dean, College of Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science, Kennesaw State University

BIO

Dr. Richard Vengroff, a political scientist specializing in comparative politics (Canada and Africa), comparative electoral systems, development administration and management, did his graduate work at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. He is a recipient of the “Ordre National du Lion” (Senegal’s highest civilian honor) for his contributions to higher education and development in that country. Dr. Vengroff has lived and worked overseas for over eight of the last 30 years and has conducted field research and been involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of development projects and numerous exchange and linkage programs around the world. He has recently served a two-year term as vice president of the American Council on Quebec Studies, and program Chair for the meetings in Charleston, South Carolina. He was the campus project Director for a FIPSE funded North American Mobility Grant (UConn, SUNY, U.Laval, Carleton, U of Monterey)), PI for the Canadian I-Poll Project of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research and a participant in a USIS funded NAFTA faculty exchange research program (University of Calgary). Dr. Vengroff has participated in linkage projects in Estonia, Venezuela, Chile, and Hungary. He has also served as team leader and PI on numerous multi-million dollar AID funded projects in sub-Saharan Africa. He also served as a trustee of the Consortium for International Development based in Tucson.

Dr. Vengroff is also the author, or editor, of seven books, 90 articles and book chapters in scholarly journals and books, a series of widely used training materials in project management and a development simulation. His current research is devoted to issues of Canadian and Quebec politics, development management, democratic governance, decentralization, and privatization. He is the past editor for the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA) Comparative Administration Papers and book review editor for Representation and Electoral Systems.

Panelists: