Center for Regional History and Culture Kennesaw State University

 
Southern Industrialization Project

Annual Meeting
Kennesaw State University
June 13-14, 2008
 

The Southern Industrialization Project (SIP) seeks to foster a greater understanding of the history and culture of industrialization in the American South. SIP primarily consists of a discussion list of more than 100 academic and public historians with research interests that encompass many industries, eras, and geographic locations. Each year we meet to hear scholarly papers and to propose methods for promoting research in Southern industrial history.

Co-sponsored by
KSU's Center for Regional History & Culture

 

Southern Industrialization Project Conference
Kennesaw State University
June 13-14, 2008

 

Friday, June 13                     

3:15-5:00 Session I:  Industrial Projects in Public History Roundtable
Social Science 3029    

Chair: Ray Luce, Director of the Historic Preservation Division, Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Jack Wynn, North Georgia College & State University; also Executive Director of Friends of Scull Shoals
Margaret Calhoon, Georgia Power Corporate Archives
Karen Utz, Curator, Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark

Comment: Randall Gooden, Clayton State University

 

5:30-7:00        Reception and Keynote, Jolley Lodge

7:00-8:00 Keynote "Apologies, Regrets and Reparations"
Stanley Engerman, President, Southern Industrialization Project

 

Saturday, June 14

Session II, 8:30-10:00: New South Entrepreneurs
Social Science 3029

Chair: Michael Gagnon, Georgia Gwinnett College

"Georgia's Etowah River Valley as Seedbed of the New South: Gold, Iron, Coal, and the Impetus for Birmingham"
G. Richard Wright and Kenneth H. Wheeler, Reinhardt College

"Mining Black Diamonds: Extracting Coal from North-Central Alabama, 1866-1890"
James Sanders Day, University of Montevallo

"Sawmilling and the Courts in Antebellum New Orleans: A Study of the
Firm of Miller & Shepherd"
John Robert Keeling, III, McNeese State University

Comment: Randy Patton, Kennesaw State University
Saturday, June 14

8:30 a.m.-10:00 Session III:  Southern Labor Studies Association Session
Social Science 3007

Chair: Michelle Haberland, Georgia Southern University

"'Bearing arms to repel invasion is a part of our great American
Heritage': NASCAR, Bill France, and the Drivers' Union Movements of the
1960s"
Dan Pierce, University of North Carolina, Asheville

Comment: Richard Starnes, Western Carolina University
Comment: Michelle Haberland, Georgia Southern University

 

10:15-11:45 Session IV: Conflicting Views of Southern Industrialization
Social Science 3029

Chair: Michele Gillespie, Wake Forest University

Religious Criticism of Southern Industry: "An Appeal to the Industrial
Leaders of the South"
Bart Dredge, Austin College

"An Industrious Generation: The Watauga Club and Industrial Education,
1884-1912"
Samuel L. Schaffer, Yale University

Comment: Angela Lakwete, Auburn University

 

10:15-11:45 Session V: Environmental Aspects of Southern Industrialization
Social Science 3007

Chair: Steven Reich, James Madison University

"Yellow Jack Rides the Rails: Jacksonville's Yellow Fever Epidemic of
1888 and Florida's Railroads"
R. Scott Huffard, Jr., University of Florida

"'You learnt to spin and you learnt to hear:' Sensory History,
Soundscapes and the Lives of Southern Millhands, 1915-1940" Gerard J.
Fitzgerald, New York University

Comment: Steven Reich

12:00-1:30 Lunch

1:30-3:00 Panel Discussion:  Assessing the State of Southern Economic History
Social Science 3029

Moderator: Louis Kyriakoudes, University of Southern Mississippi

Gavin Wright, Stanford University
David L. Carlton, Vanderbilt University
Stanley Engerman, University of Rochester Susanna Delfino, University of
Genoa

 

3:30-5:30 Field Trip
Caravan to tour the Etowah Iron Works (antebellum iron works) at nearby
Red Top Mountain State Park

 

Sponsors:
Southern Industrialization Project
Shaw Industries Chair
Center for Regional History & Culture

 

 
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